The 4 biggest swim form blunders (and how to fix them) Part 4: Hand and shoulder position

The 4 biggest swim form blunders (and how to fix them) Part 4: Hand and shoulder position

Reaching forward and pulling through with a long, effective stroke is the key to swimming efficiently. When you’re too tight in the upper torso you are limiting your reach while creating more side-to-side movement than you are forward.

The 4 biggest swim form blunders (and how to fix them) - Part 1: Overreaching

The 4 biggest swim form blunders (and how to fix them) - Part 1: Overreaching

I often hear from people that the number one reason they couldn’t do a triathlon is because of the swim. They never mention running or cycling, and seem both fearful of swimming at distance or show a lack of confidence in their ability.

This four-series article will explore the common issues that most people face with swimming and will provide some solutions for addressing the issue.

Effective Swimming from the Hips

Effective Swimming from the Hips

Just like in running, athletes gain power through the rotation of the torso, shoulders, and hips. Engaging your core, chest, and back muscles help transfer power from one side to another and, along with your kick, make up the fundamentals of swimming propulsion. 

However the rotation plays a bigger role in swimming than just forming the basis of propelling yourself through the water. There are a few important reasons.